War Criminal Bradley Manning Found Not Guilty On Aiding Enemy – Guilty On Other Charges, Faces 150 Years

Excerpted from DEFCON HILL

Former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning was found guilty Tuesday of five espionage accounts.

The decision means Manning could spend the rest of his life behind bars. The maximum sentence for the charges would be 150 years.

Army Judge Col. Denise Lind found the 25-year old former Army Private guilty of the five charges. She also found Manning guilty of five charges of theft.

But he was found not guilty of the most serious charge of providing aid to the enemy, which carries a life sentence.

Prior to Tuesday’s ruling, Lind denied a request by Manning’s defense team to have the aiding the enemy charge dropped.

At the time, Lind said Manning’s lawyers had not presented enough evidence to merit dismissing the charge.

Manning had already pleaded guilty to 10 offenses, but denied 12 counts related to and including the aiding the enemy allegations.

Manning has admitted he provided classified information to WikiLeaks in an attempt to spark public debate on U.S. actions in Iraq and around the world.

Much of the information included classified State Department cables between Washington and various diplomatic outposts.

However, Manning also sent classified video of U.S. air strikes in Iraq where civilians were injured or killed.

He provided a video that showed American attack helicopters firing on foreign journalists in Iraq when the news crew was mistaken for a group of insurgents.

Manning supporters claim his actions shed much-needed light on flawed American diplomatic, military and intelligence operations.

However, Army prosecutors argued successfully that by making that information public, Manning essentially hand-delivered U.S. state secrets to American adversaries like al Qaeda, the Taliban and other global terrorist organizations. Keep reading

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Bradley Manning Found Not Guilty On Aiding Enemy – Guilty On Other Charges, Faces 150 Years

Jul 30, 2013 0 Comments Chuck Biscuits

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Excerpted from The Hill: Former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning was found guilty Tuesday of five espionage accounts.

The decision means Manning could spend the rest of his life behind bars. The maximum sentence for the charges would be 150 years.

Army Judge Col. Denise Lind found the 25-year old former Army Private guilty of the five charges. She also found Manning guilty of five charges of theft.

But he was found not guilty of the most serious charge of providing aid to the enemy, which carries a life sentence.

Prior to Tuesday’s ruling, Lind denied a request by Manning’s defense team to have the aiding the enemy charge dropped.

At the time, Lind said Manning’s lawyers had not presented enough evidence to merit dismissing the charge.

Manning had already pleaded guilty to 10 offenses, but denied 12 counts related to and including the aiding the enemy allegations.

Manning has admitted he provided classified information to WikiLeaks in an attempt to spark public debate on U.S. actions in Iraq and around the world.

Much of the information included classified State Department cables between Washington and various diplomatic outposts.

However, Manning also sent classified video of U.S. air strikes in Iraq where civilians were injured or killed.

He provided a video that showed American attack helicopters firing on foreign journalists in Iraq when the news crew was mistaken for a group of insurgents.

Manning supporters claim his actions shed much-needed light on flawed American diplomatic, military and intelligence operations.

However, Army prosecutors argued successfully that by making that information public, Manning essentially hand-delivered U.S. state secrets to American adversaries like al Qaeda, the Taliban and other global terrorist organizations. Keep reading

FORT MEADE, Md. –

U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning has been acquitted of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks.

The military judge hearing the case, Army Col. Denise Lind, announced the verdict Tuesday. The charge was the most serious of 21 counts. It carried a possible life sentence without parole.

Manning was convicted of five espionage counts, five theft charges, a computer fraud charge and other military infractions.

Manning’s sentencing hearing is set to begin Wednesday.

The 25-year-old Crescent, Okla., native acknowledged giving the anti-secrecy website hundreds of thousands of battlefield reports, diplomatic cables and videos in early 2010.

Manning said he didn’t believe the information would harm troops in Afghanistan and Iraq or threaten national security.

FORT MEADE, Md. (AP)

A military judge Tuesday acquitted Pfc. Bradley Manning of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge the Army intelligence analyst faced for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified military reports and diplomatic cables.

Manning was convicted on nearly all of the lesser charges considered by the judge, Army Col. Denise Lind, in connection with the largest breach of classified material in U.S. history.

The suspense at the court martial session was limited because Manning previously pled guilty to 10 of the 22 counts he faced. Those charges carry a potential sentence of 20 years. The aiding-the-enemy charge can lead result in a sentence of up to life in prison or event to the death penalty, but the military did not seek capital punishment in Manning’s case.

If convicted on all charges apart from aiding the enemy, Manning faced a potential sentence of up to 154 years.

Manning did not dispute the fact that he sent WikiLeaks most of the material that led to the charges against him. However, his defense argued that some of the counts were legally flawed.

The Army intelligence analyst was arrested in May 2010 in Iraq at a forward operating base where he studied threats in a section of Baghdad. He’s been in custody since.

As soon as Wednesday, the court martial is expected to move into a sentencing phase. Prosecutors are expected to call witnesses demonstrating the harm caused by Manning’s disclosures, while the defense will seek to undercut that evidence and argue for leniency.

Lind ruled in January that Manning is entitled to a sentencing credit of nearly four months as a result of what she determined was unnecessarily harsh treatment the intelligence analysts received during his almost nine-month stay at a Marine Corps brig in Quantico, Va.

Manning’s case is one of an unprecedented flurry of leak-related criminal prosecutions brought under the Obama administration. A total of seven such cases have been brought in the past four and a half years, more than double the number of such cases in all prior administrations combined.

The administration expressed no regret about its handling of the recent wave of cases until earlier this year, when extensive attention to the Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records and a search warrant for a Fox reporter’s emails in a leak investigation led to a review of longstanding guidelines for such probes.

After an internal review, Attorney General Eric Holder changed DOJ policies to make it more difficult to access journalists’ work materials in instances where they are not the target of an investigation.

However, the case against Manning was prosecuted in the military justice system, which is separate from the civilian courts.

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